Super Organizing-Guru to the Rescue!

Location Queen Creek Library

Get Organized

Are your papers piling up? Does your inbox need an inbox? Is your office causing you stress? Join us for a FREE workshop that will help you clear the clutter, empty your inbox, conquer your paperwork and reduce your stress.

If your office is out of control – come to this workshop and learn how to achieve total tranquility in your home office.

Topics we will be discussing:
• Deciding the purpose of your home office
• Desk organization
• Filing systems
• Organizing “Snail” Mail
• Bill payment systems
• Organizing your emails

Please remember to register since seating is limited for this special workshop.
Registration Ends: 6/17/2015 at 2:00 PM

Presenter: Pam Fitzgibbons

Date: 6/17/2015
Start Time: 5:00 PM
End Time: 6:00 PM

Get Reel Documentary Film Series Summer 2015

The Get Reel documentary film series is back at the Downtown Chandler Public Library this summer. The free Get Reel documentary film series runs every Tuesday evening starting June 9th through August 11th from 6:30pm to 8:30pm.

Location:
Downtown Library (Copper Room on 2nd Floor)
22 South Delaware Street
Chandler, AZ 85255

Get Reel Documentary Film Series

“We are excited to screen 10 first-run documentary films this summer, with several being exclusive premieres before they are shown on PBS in prime-time this fall,” said Chandler Librarian Ted Liebler. “Our renovated Copper Room has been enhanced to truly optimize the film watching experience with upgraded audio & video equipment and controllable room lighting for a real cinema experience.”

The Get Reel film series is made possible by a partnership between Chandler Public Library and POV (Point of View), Public Television’s premier documentary series. Since 1988, POV has been the home for the world’s boldest contemporary filmmakers, celebrating intriguing personal stories that spark conversation and inspire action. It is produced by American Documentary, Inc.

“This year’s films feature strong individuals that viewers won’t easily forget,” said POV Executive Producer Chris White. “Intimate and urgent, these are the stories of our times. We are proud to present a slate of films that challenge, enlighten and inspire.”

The complete film schedule, including descriptions, is below:

June 9
The Overnighters (by Jesse Moss)
Desperate, broken men chase their dreams and run from their demons in the North Dakota oil fields. A local pastor risks everything to help them.

June 16
Cutie and the Boxer (by Zachary Heinzerling)
An Oscar®-nominated reflection on love, sacrifice and the creative spirit, this candid New York tale explores the chaotic 40-year marriage of famed “boxing” painter Ushio Shinohara and artist Noriko Shinohara.

June 23
Tough Love (by Stephanie Wang-Breal)
This moving film accompanies two parents as they navigate the often-murky waters of the foster-care system, trying to reunite with their children and prove that they deserve second chances.

June 30
Art and Craft (directed by Sam Cullman & Jennifer Grausman; co-directed by Mark Becker)
The jig is up for art forger Mark Landis, who has donated his expertcopies to museums for 30 years. But stopping isn’t simple. This caper uncovers the universal in one man’s search for connection and respect.

July 7
Tea Time (by Maite Alberdi)
Tea Time visits with five well-heeled Chilean women who have met monthly for tea and pastries for 60 years, offering an intimate view of life’s joys and difficulties—and the enduring power of friendship.

July 14
Web Junkie (by Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia)
In China, Internet addiction has been declared a national health crisis. With extraordinary access, Web Junkie delves into the treatment regimen for teenagers in a three-month military-style rehab program.

July 21
The Storm Makers (by Guillaume Suon)
This chilling exposé of Cambodia’s human trafficking underworld weaves the story of a peasant girl sold into slavery at 16 with that of two traffickers who use deception to funnel a stream of poor and illiterate people across the country’s borders.

July 28
Beats of the Antonov (by Hajooj Kuka)
Beats of the Antonov explores how music binds a community in the war-ravaged Sudan region, where people celebrate their survival and battle to maintain their heritage, even as bombs drop all around them.

August 4
Neuland (by Anna Thommen)
Neuland (“New Territory”) immerses viewers in a Swiss integration class, where for two years adolescent immigrants struggle to learn a new language, prepare for employment and reveal their hopes and dreams.

August 11
Point and Shoot (By Marshall Curry)
Two-time Oscar® nominee Marshall Curry’s Point and Shoot rides shotgun with Matt VanDyke, who films his self-transformation from a timid 26-year-old to a motorcycle-driving rebel, fighting in the Libyan revolution.

Guilt Free Book Club Upcoming Books (May – October)

The Guilt Free Book Club is perfect for people who like to read or even those that don’t.  A friendly group of people that like to meet once a month and share time together.  Usually talking about the book they just read or wished they would have read.

The group meets the Second Wednesday of every month at 6pm.

The Upcoming List

May

We’re going to do an exercise from Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Better Edwards.  The woman who’s name I forget will select the exercise and invite an artist.

 June

A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life by Brian Grazer 

July

A Heartbreaking Work Of Staggering Genius: A Memoir Based on a True Story by Dave Eggers 

August

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee (comes out in July)

September

Socrates Café: A Fresh Taste of Philosophy by Christopher Phillips

October

Oh the Places You’ll Go by Dr. Seuss

The Emergence of the Maker Movement

The Maker Movement is becoming mainstream. Over 135 millions adults in the United States alone actively involved. It has become a world wide phenomenon with Maker Faires in Japan, Italy, Norway and Chile. Makers are doing more than just creating for fun or hobby. They are contributing nearly $29 billion to the U.S. economy annually.

Who would of thought that Martha Stewart would be talking about the 3D printed roses?  or That President Obama would be announcing $240 million in STEM commitments at the White House science fair?

The Emergence of the Maker Movement and what it looks like by the numbers.

The Emergence of the Maker Movement

 

 

Chandler Science Spectacular

Arizona Scitech Chandler Science Spectacular

Science is on display in a way you haven’t experienced it before at the Chandler Science Spectacular. From cartoons to lava lamps and fingerprints to flight simulation, this festival connects everyday life to science through interactive, hands-on exhibits. The two day event is in Downtown Chandler and runs 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20 (A Night of Art & Science) and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21 (Science Saturday).

This year, the Science Saturday event is joined by the E.P.I.C. Fest (Explore. Play. Imagine. Create.), showcasing the Maker culture. Makers are hobbyists, tinkerers, engineers, programmers and people using new and unique technologies, as well as traditional forms of DIY.

SciTech Chandler Science Spectacular

 

More than 70 exhibits are on display; below are just a few examples:

Science Fiction TV Dinner: Center for Science and the Imagination at ASU Classic Warner Bros cartoon shorts about space exploration followed by a conversation with experts in Space Exploration and Animation.

Flight Simulator: Garmin Feel the power of flight with Garmin’s flight simulator

Crime Scene & Fingerprinting: City of Chandler Police Department Solve the mystery at this interactive mock crime scene, or learn how to read fingerprints when they are left as clues.

Rocket Launch: Orbital Sciences See how Orbital puts rockets into space with this hands on rocket-launching demo

Breaking Boards & Science: Sport Science of Martial Arts Who knew how fun applied physics can be? Feel the explosive power of changing acceleration or changing mass when you attempt to break plastic boards

Foam Block Building: The Arizona Science Center & First Things First Families can use giant foam blocks of all shapes to build a design they create.

Lava Lamp Creation: Primavera Online High School Kids make their own Flubber or personal Lava Lamp to learn about oil & water.
Game Truck Spaceship: Game Truck * Available 1 to 4 p.m. Travel through the solar system with game truck spaceship

Technology & the Library: Downtown Chandler Library Learn to use Zinio, featuring more than 500 multi-language magazines, along with library iPads and eReaders to access eBooks, databases, Freegal, and BookMyne.

Chandler Science Spectacular is part of the Arizona SciTech Festival, a statewide movement to promote and celebrate science in our daily lives and to earn recognition for Arizona as a science and technology hub. The Chandler Science Spectacular is sponsored by Intel, and all events are free and open to the public.

IMG_1971

 

Chandler Parade of Lights and Tumbleweed Tree Lighting

You may have noticed the holiday lights are on in Downtown Chandler as they were lit during Chandler Rock the Block. However, the official holiday kick off happens Saturday December 6th as the 25th annual Parade of Lights comes down Arizona Avenue and the 58th annual lighting of the Tumbleweed Tree take place.

Tumbleweed Tree Lighting

Tumbleweed Tree Lighting

More than 12,000 people are expected to join in the festivities that start at 4:30pm. There will be a variety of musical and dance performances as well as inflatables and other other activities for children including pony rides and visists with Santa Claus. Add this year is an Ugly Sweater contest for individuals, couples and families.

The pageantry of the Parade of Lights begins at 7 p.m. and the parade route will start at the corner of Arizona Avenue and Frye Road. The festive floats and other entries will move north on Arizona Avenue, past Chandler City Hall and continue through the downtown area. As it reaches the north end of Dr. A.J. Chandler Park the procession will turn right on Buffalo Street, followed by another right turn onto Arizona Place. After moving along the east side of Dr. A.J. Chandler Park, the parade will end at the corner of Boston Street and Arizona Place.

At the conclusion of the parade (approximately 8 p.m.), guests are invited to gather in the center of the park on the west side of Arizona Avenue for the Tumbleweed Tree lighting ceremony.

You can find more information here.

PARKING AND TRAFFIC RESTRICTIONS

Guests attending the event are strongly encouraged to arrive early to find parking. There are multiple locations with free parking, including two parking garages on the east side of Arizona Avenue, and several surface lots.

Residents are reminded that Arizona Avenue will be closed between Chandler Boulevard and Frye Road from 3:30-10 p.m. Frye Road will also be restricted from Arizona Avenue east to Delaware Street from 3:30 – 10:00pm Several other smaller streets in the downtown area will also be closed or restricted during the festivities.

A map showing street closures and parking options, including parking for the disabled, is online at www.chandleraz.gov/special-events.

ENTERTAINMENT SCHEDULE

Stage Schedule

4:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m. Stacy J Dancing
5:00 p.m. – 5:20 p.m. The Dance Loft
5:30 p.m. – 5:50 p.m. Talent Team Perfoming Arts
6:00 p.m. – 6:20 p.m. Ugly Sweater Contest
7:00 p.m. Parade
8:00 p.m. (approx.) Tree Lighting Ceremony with Mayor Jay Tibshraeny
8:40 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Studio 3 Performing Arts Academy

HISTORY OF CHANDLER’S TUMBLEWEED TREE

A Community Tradition

This unique Chandler tradition began in 1957, when Chandler resident Earl Barnum raised the idea of a tumbleweed tree after he saw a similar one in Indiana built out of cone-shaped chicken wire with pine boughs stuck in the holes. Many members of the community helped create the first tree in Chandler using tumbleweeds that they gathered from around town. Little did these folks know that they were the first to do such a thing and that it would continue as an annual Christmas tradition from then on. In fact, Chandler is the only city in the southwestern United States that has such a tree.

How is it done?

First, members of the City’s Park Operations Division gather tumbleweeds from the outskirts of the City. With Chandler’s rapid growth and development, fewer stretches of empty land are within the City limits, which makes it harder to find tumbleweeds in large quantities. So, the Park crews must start collecting the tumbleweeds earlier each year. Nearly 1,000 tumbling tumbleweeds are collected each year and are used to adorn a 25-foot tall wire frame.

Then, the tumbleweeds are sprayed with 25 gallons of white paint, 20 gallons of flame retardant and dusted with 65 pounds of glitter. The tree is later adorned with approximately 1,200 holiday lights that give it a spectacular look, day or night. The lighting of the Tumbleweed Tree draws a large crowd, with more than 12,000 expected to watch the Mayor and members of the City Council flip the switch to light this magnificent sight. The Tumbleweed Tree Lighting Ceremony and the Parade of Lights (starting at 7 p.m.) help to bring our community together to kick-off the holidays.

4 Issues Surrounding Workforce Development for Technology Companies

The Arizona Technology Council released a report from a survey that the University of Phoenix and the Technology Councils of North America recently did on Software Development Competencies to better understand workforce development issues in software development occupations. Asking the following Questions. (Three Roles: Mobile, Application and Web Developer)

1. What is the primary reason for the reported talent shortage in the software development sector (quantity or quality)?
83% of respondents indicated there is clearly a talent shortage.
51% stated the most significant cause is the local market does not have an adequate supply of available works entering the field (quantity).
27% stated the most significant cause is available workers do not have adequate skills and education to occupy the roles (quality).

Soft Skills

2. What 3 to 5 most critical skills must individuals have to perform effectively in there high-demand software development roles in the next 2 to 4 years?
The majority of respondents saw User Interface Design, Architecture and Java as key skills in the next 2 to 4 years.
Programming, Web Design and Data Warehousing were seen as necessary skills for all roles.
88% of the respondents felt “Soft Skills” were equally or more important than technical skills.

3. What education and certifications will be required by individuals in the next 2 to 4 years to preform successfully in three high-demand software roles?
45% felt less than a bachelor’s degree was necessary for web/mobile development.
Only 7% felt greater than a bachelor’s degree was necessary.
Less than 30% felt industry certifications were valuable.

4. What are employers doing to cope with future anticipated skill gaps in three high-demand software development roles?
Only 69% of employers are doing something about it.
68% plan on conducting internal training
64% plan on offering internships
53% plan on retraining employees
51% plan on network building

Report summary: UOPX-TECNA Software Development Survey Results.

City of Mesa Open Data Road Show

The City of Mesa and Code for America are hosting an Open Data regional event on September 4th. The benefits of Open Data range from enhancing government performance to increasing public participation. Show up and explore the process and outcomes of implementing data driven initiatives.

Code_for_America_Summit_2013___Flickr_-_Photo_Sharing_

In Attendance:

  • City officials who have adopted open data policies (Phoenix, Tucson)
  • Start-ups/entrepreneurs who use open data, creating new job opportunities.
  • Community groups actively developing projects that affect the city and it’s residents (eg: transit, health, park apps).
  • ASU faculty and staff researchers who benefit by and contribute to open data sets (eg: budget, water usage).
  • Citizens!

At past events people walked away energized and committed to implement new practices, host hackathons and develop community partnerships. It is an opportunity to share, ask questions and learn from other departments, partner cities, start-ups and community members.

“I thought the open data roadshow was very informative and inspirational! I thoroughly enjoyed it ” -Tony Heinrichs, Deputy Chief Operating Officer, Infrastructure/Public Works, City of San Diego

Goals:

  • Bringing the best of open data practices, policies and experiences to cities.
  • Educating a government audience to the concept, values, and opportunities of open data.
  • Consulting and troubleshooting how government staff can pursue open data within their own agencies.
  • Sharing resources and best practices to support governments interested in implementing open data.

The Logistics:
Open Data Roadshow: Mesa
Thursday September 4th 8:30am – 1:00pm
Mesa Arts Center – 1 E Main St, Mesa, AZ 85201
Free of Charge with breakfast and lunch provided!

RSVP Here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/open-data-roadshow-mesa-tickets-12361508605

More info here:
http://opendataroadshow.com/

Desert Code Camp 2014 (October)

Desert Code Camp 2014 has been announced for October 18th.

Be part of the creative process as they plan for Desert Code Camp – Desert Code Camp 2014.2! Suggest a session! Suggestions will be immediately visible once you submit. If you want to Teach a session, choose “I can teach this” when submitting a session.

Desert Code Camp

What is a Code Camp?

By and For the Developer Community
Code Conferences are about the developer community at large. They are meant to be a place for developers to come and learn from their peers. Topics are always based on community interest and never determined by anyone other than the community.

Always Free
Code Conferences are always free for attendees.

Community Developed Material
The success of the Code Conferences is that they are based on community content. All content that is delivered is original. All presentation content must be provided completely (including code) without any restriction. If you have content you don’t want to share or provide to attendees then the Technology Conference is not the place for you.

No Fluff: Only Code
Code Conferences are about showing the code. Refer to rule #1 if you have any questions on this.

Community Ownership
The most important element of the Technology Conference is always the developer community. All are welcome to attend and speak and do so without expectation of payment or any other compensation other than their participation in the community.

Never occur during work hours
We need to understand that many times people can’t leave work for a day or two to attend training or even seminars. The beauty of the Technology Conference is that they always occur on weekends.

Danger Recycling Lives On

When we first moved into downtown Chandler, Chuck Reynolds fought hard to get us access to recycling services.  As it turns out, commercial recycling in an urban setting can be more difficult than you would think.  Shortly afterwards blue cans started showing up.

Danger Recycling

The lid of the can surfaced some problems that many who had to handle trash complained about.  David Monaghan, Kevin Odea and Stephen Minkin collaborated to give it some Dan Gerous style.