Community Meeting Notes, July 2, 2014

Discussion on Frequency, Schedule of Meetings

Community meetings have recently been sparse, but when we have them, they’ve been long and, at times, heated. We discussed improving the format.

Jeremy S. proposed moving to a monthly schedule. Derek N. wasn’t a fan, mainly because he saw value in attempting to meet, even if there wasn’t much to discuss. Troy B. argued that a full hour is difficult to commit to.

The community present settled on a: making a commitment to attempt to meet weekly, even if there wasn’t anything on an agenda. The goal is to constantly be dangerous, and thus, have things to talk about. Also b: holding meetings to 30 minutes. We should push longer topics to side conversations for interested parties. Also, if a conversation needs to continue and you need to go, feel free to. Also c: creating a shared calendar item that pop-ups a reminder for meeting.

Recap Desk Move

Discussion was held on various topics around the desk move. Desk and area tidiness led to a discussion about the frequency of events. If more events occur, the more it “hurts” to move out when you have lots of stuff. The re-labeled desks should be like a paint-by-numbers for event hosts.

Overall, we need a much more clear set of expectations for users of our space. If an event uses the space, they are 100% responsible for moving desks, chairs, etc, and setting back up. If peoples’ belongings get orphaned in the process, it is not the event host’s fault. (see above) All events should be tied to a sponsoring keyholder/babysitter. Keyholder is jointly responsible (with facilities team) to communicate expectations and ensure compliance. Jeremy S. and Chris L. will work on this.

Kameron W. will photograph rooms to use as guides for re-set after use.

Window Painting

The community agreed that we learned a lesson from the painted window for promotion of events. Aside from question about the city’s policy on such activity in the DC, overall we felt it didn’t fit our desired image. Discussion continued about a failure to communicate that image and how we can improve, but ended without resolution.

When Arizona Reads, Arizona Thrives.

summerreading When Arizona Reads, Arizona Thrives.

Help Arizona Put Reading First! Read 20 minutes everyday this summer.

5 Things you can do to increase summer reading:

  1. Sign up the whole family for the library’s Fizz, Boom, Read!  summer reading program at Chandler Public Library.
  2. Ask your librarian for suggestions of great books to read with your child.
  3. Use the “Find a Book” tool at http://readonarizona.org to find books that match a developing reader’s reading level.
  4. Set a goal of reading 20 minutes everyday.  For very young children and struggling readers, the 20 minutes can be spread throughout the day.
  5. Make reading fun.

Exciting new way to track summer reading.

Many Arizona libraries are piloting an exciting new way to track summer reading.  Read, play games and do other fun activities to earn achievement badges online.

Dig deeper to make a reader.

Ask questions about the stories you read together: “Why do you think [the character] did that?”

1st Annual AZChaserCon Recap

Last week, I had the pleasure of welcoming Christian Cleary (@monsoon_madness) and the Arizona Storm Chaser community to Gangplank to host the first (and hopefully annual) Arizona Storm Chaser Convention, or AZChaserCon.

Storm chasers play a key role in assisting intergovernmental organizations in understanding local weather events while they also help the local and national news report many of the fascinating Arizona weather events with their photos, videos, and stories. Arizona has some uniquely beautiful and fascinating weather events that are only known to the world by the work of these dedicated citizen scientists and their thrilling antics in the southwest deserts.

Christian Cleary, known best by his twitter handle @monsoon_madness, knows the power of community and collaboration in the tight-knit circle that makes up local storm chasers, government meteorologists, and news media. He was inspired to bring everyone together and found Gangplank to be the perfect host.

During the day-long event, held Saturday June 14th, Christian welcomed the likes of 3TV’s Royal Norman, 12 News’s Dr Matt Price, and National Weather Service’s Dr Ken Waters, as well as many members of chaser and citizen science community. They came together to collaborate, socialize, learn, and share the crazy antics of their hobby as they ready for another Arizona Monsoon season. There was community socializing, occasional jokes about haboobs, nerdy weather talk, and tons of great pictures of local storms.

I asked Chris to share more about his event and he wrote this for us:

Gangplank is the definition of community. When you walk through the door, the environment is uplifting, full with positive vibes and great people. And if you’re tech savvy, trust me, this is the place to be.

I live in Chandler and have a huge passion for weather. I storm chase the monsoon storms as well as tornadoes on the Great Plains. Recently, I decided to host a conference specifically for chasing the AZ monsoon that would bring weather enthusiasts, weather professionals, scientists, spotters, and storm chasers together to network, share experience, and inspire one another. A friend suggested I look into Gangplank as a possible venue.

I scheduled a time to meet with Chris L, who gave me a tour and invited me to host my event there. He also introduced me to Eileen K and the two of them helped guide me and set this conference up. On the day of the event, Jeremy S volunteered his time to host us and helped me with technical issues.

On June 14th, I hosted the first ever Arizona Chaser Conference at Gangplank, Chandler. The event exceeded all of my expectations. All of the people who attended the conference had nothing but great things to say. They enjoyed the facilities and the conference. Huge shout out to Chris, Eileen, Jeremy, and the whole Gangplank Community for making this possible. I can’t wait to host AZChaserCon next year at this amazing place. I hope that I can give back to the Gangplank community what they have given me. Without their support and sponsorship I would not have been able to host this event.

Well, Chris, let me give you and your people some praise too: you guys were a great group and gracious considerate guests. We loved having you join our community and share yours with us. We look forward to AZChaserCon ’15!

For more info check these out:

Community Meeting Notes, June 25, 2014

Saturday Goblinz Party:

The special event on Saturday 6/28, the Goblinz Costume Party, is an alternative art demonstration including costuming, art displays, and maker projects. Event is open to the public. Setup begins at 4PM and event is 7PM – 10PM.

Desk Move Out/Space Rearrange:

Associated with the event Saturday is a main space move out. Specifically, we will move all desks but leave the lounge and maker desks. We will begin this move-out at 4PM on Friday 6/27. If you need to move earlier, you may, but no earlier than 12 noon. We ask for as much participation/volunteer help from the community possible, and after cleared out, we will do some cleaning and could use the help there too!

The Goblinz party volunteers will reset the hot desks, including power, and monitors. Resident desks will be done by 9AM Monday 6/30, although some people will gather at 1PM on Sunday 6/29 to partially put back some of the space.

We are coordinating our semi-annual desk rearrange with this move out. Jill R (BespokeSS) will begin distributing the layout maps later this week built the new desk plan.

DeskMoveJun2014 1024x767 Community Meeting Notes, June 25, 2014

If you cannot be here for move out/move back, please clear off your desk prior to move out.  In this case, your goal is to leave an empty desk so that volunteers don’t need to worry about your property getting lost/broken.

Please be mindful of orphaned property following the desk move out. All project spaces should be cleaned and reset by the 9AM Monday start of day.

Notes on Space Cleanliness:

The community discussed the overall cleanliness of the space, specifically as it relates to keeping it presentable. There are concerns that individuals and companies approach the organization and cleanliness of their space with different standards, some with no standard at all. This leaves our Gangplank looking dingy, disoraganizaed, and unpresentable. It also raises concerns for those who bring clients here for meetings. Finally, with the recent carelessness of guests using project spaces and hot-desks and leaving them a mess, we theorized that by not holding ourselves to a higher standard, we are allowing a ‘broken window‘ affect to impact the rest of the space.

We want Gangplank to be a place that is welcoming to everyone. We agreed to holding ourselves and each other accountable to keeping our desks cleaner. We also committed to individually taking greater ownership of common areas. Boldness over Assurance & Friendship over Formality applies: if you feel your neighbor isn’t living up to this standard, you need to let them know!

As part of the desk move this weekend, please do the following:

  • Clean up your area, specifically anything stored under your desk or in the isles. As a general rule, if you don’t find yourself using it at least once per week, it should go home. We encourage all to take home, donate, or throw out as much as possible.
  • Things you determine you need should be stored under your desks in a rolling credenza. Ikea Galant credenzas and file cabinets are common and match the desks and are very affordable at $169 – $199.
  • Any broken/damaged chairs should be tossed out Friday afternoon.
  • Decorative items on your desk are discouraged.
  • Your desk should be clear enough when you are done each day such that someone else could use it as a hot desk when you are not in.

Janitorial:

Greg T (Marketing Press) asked about janitorial and funding. Chris L (CSI), who coordinates it, will re-send the email outlining what the janitor does as well as remind those who have not yet contributed to the fund how they can.

Supplies Needed:

There was a call-out for community members to please purchase and donate some useable materials. Talk to Jeremy S (Bonanza) for specs if you’re able to contribute. We need:

  • Light Bulbs
  • Plastic Forks
  • Plastic Knifes
  • Clorox Bleach Wipes
  • Pledge Wipes

Also, Jeremy S needs help sourcing alternate Mountain Dew flavors for the soda machines. Specifically Code Red, Voltage, and Baja Blast. Basically, most of the grocery store sales (4 for $11, 4 for $10) require a minimum purchase. If they are under $3.33 for a 12-pack, Jeremy will reimburse you cost if you can pick them up for us.

Startup Weekend:

Startup Weekend is coming! We still need everyone to personally promote it your entreprenuer friends. If you can follow @swchandler and RT promo posts, that will also help. We have room for a few more sponsors for meals and transportation costs for our facilitor. Write Trish G for more info.

Community Meetings & Huddles:

Earlier this year we came to the realization that meeting weekly was unnecessary. We stopped meeting every week, but now we meet too little. Jeremy S proposed that we meet formally once per month but encourage a concept of “calling a huddle” whenever someone wishes to drive action or seek support.

Basic idea behind a huddle: approaching the microphone and announcing that any available person gather for a huddle meeting. A huddle should be limited to a single topic and last no more than five minutes. Huddle topics should be biased toward action.

We discussed giving this approach, a less obtrusive and less formal solution, a try. We will see what happens.

Social Activities to Build Community

Greg T introduced discussion to encourage more social activities at GP. This was driven by smaller group conversations recently. He explained that the community was stronger when we were more social, but recent busyness has kept some of us head-down more than not. While socializing shouldn’t require specific planning, it will help if a few people plan some engaging social event.

Greg will be organizing a new regular “show and tell happy hour” similar to an activity he saw at New Work City in New York, NY.

After a Eileen K discussed how 4th Friday GP breakfasts at Yoli’s has slowly been loosing attendance, Trish G pointed out that variety is important. Jeremy S reminded the group that personal invitations work best and that merely throwing FB & meet-up invites out there won’t work, whether its 4th Friday breakfast or show and tell.

Finding Your Passion and Purpose

To be a successful person in anything in life it helps if you have Passion, Purpose & Perseverance. Perseverance is defined as steadfastness in doing something despite opposition, difficulty or delay in achieving success. Is it is easy to persevere when you know your Purpose and have a Passion about it. Passion is the gasoline in the vehicle and your Purpose is the steering wheel that has set the course for the end destination. Join with others for a fun night exploring what your Passion & Purpose is at Gangplank Chandler.

Please share! Clare Rhoads will bring her knowledge of human behavior and awesome facilitation skills. Please bring your own thought provoking questions that have helped you to gain knowledge on this topic. After the class, people will be present to answer questions about volunteer opportunities available in your community. That way you can turn your passion into action!

Join us June 9th at 6pm at Gangplank Chandler

GP Academy: Finding Your Passion and Purpose

Monday, Jun 9, 2014, 6:00 PM

Gangplank Chandler
260 S Arizona Ave

1 Gangplankers Attending

To be a successful person in anything in life it helps if you have Passion, Purpose & Perseverance. Perseverance is defined as steadfastness in doing something despite opposition, difficulty or delay in achieving success. Is it is easy to persevere when you know your Purpose and have a Passion about it. Passion is the gasoline in the vehicle and yo…

Check out this Meetup →

Summer Reading Material: Chandler’s Book Club Selections

On the second Wednesday of every month, Gangplankers gather in Chandler for a lively discussion on their latest reading material. However, this book club is a bit different. It is about the content. You don’t have to even have read the book. An interest in the topic and willingness to share fresh perspective is enough for us to welcome your presence.

However, we still get people who want to actually…read. In order to help people with that endeavor, we selected a few books in advance.

June – The Invention of Air: A Story of Science, Faith, Revolution, And The Birth Of America by Steven Johnson

July – How Will You Measure Your Life by Clayton Christensen

August – The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupery

September – Anti Fragile by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

October (in honor of Food Day) – In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan

November – Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond

Have ideas for an awesome book to include next time? Let us know. We are always looking out for great books.

Get Your Sewing On at Gangplank Avondale

Gangplank Labs just got an industrial sewing machine. Rated at 1/3 horsepower, this 1950’s era machine can sew through leather, canvas, and probably thin plywood. Some assembly required – look for future updates to see when it’s time to bring your tough sewing projects to Hack Night. (Hack night happens every Tuesday from 7-9PM. It’s free, and everyone’s invited!)
 Get Your Sewing On at Gangplank Avondale
Chris is interested in using the machine  to sew a finished edge onto some rugs, Elia is interested making her own super slim leather wallet, and Heather wants to make custom fit leather sandals. What will YOU make?

Dangercast #12 – Leadership in Gangplank

Jade Meskill, Derek Neighbors, Trish Gillam, and Chris ‘Dragon’ Lee discuss how leadership works in Gangplank.

 

Transcript

Jade Meskill:  Hello and welcome to the “Dangercast.” We are going to talk about the culture and design of Gangplank. I’m Jade Meskill.

Derek Neighbors:  I’m Derek Neighbors.

Trish Gillam:  I’m Trish Gillam.

Chris Lee:  And I’m Chris Lee.

Jade:  Today, we are going to talk about, what does it mean to be a leader inside of Gangplank?

Derek:  Inside of Gangplank, what does it take to be a leader?

Jade:  What does it mean?

Derek:  Oh, what does it mean?

Jade:  Yeah.

Derek:  I just say that what is takes would be too stupid that you are a leader.

[laughter]

Jade:  No, no. We don’t want to talk about that.

Derek:  What does it mean to be a leader? It means that you are inspiring and motivating and modeling and showing the way for other people. It’s equal parts doing and inspiration.

Jade:  How’s that different than being a leader somewhere else?

Derek:  Leader somewhere else ‑‑ usually it’s you adopted the title Leader because somebody gave you the title of leader.

Chris:  Here, you just work to make things happen. Nobody’s necessarily telling you what to do or giving you the authority to go do something. You just step up and start doing stuff and start making things happen.

Derek:  I’d say outside Gangplank, the way leadership tends to work, or that I see it in most organizations, is somebody is given the title of leader. Usually that title of leader is manager, director, vice‑president, president, CEO, you name whatever title you want to put behind that.

Two things are extended via that title. One is authority. You have the authority to do something, usually over other people. You have the authority over other people and resources to do things. If we don’t get results, it’s your fault. You get accountability.

What happens is that those that report to “said leaders,” view it exactly as that. You get to lord over me, so I have no stake and no ownership in the outcome that is to be. If anything goes wrong, it’s your fault.

Jade:  That’s positional authority.

Derek:  Positional authority.

Jade:  We’ve used the term “leaderless organization” quite a bit. I think that causes some confusion, so maybe reconcile that idea with what we’re talking about. Chris said there’s no positional authority at Gangplank. We’ve talked about that idea of being a leaderless organization. How does that actually work in practice?

Derek:  A lot of people when they think when you say “leaderless organization,” they immediately jump to, “Oh man, it’s just 100 percent chaos. Nobody’s in charge. Nothing will get done. How do you resolve any dispute? How does anything happen because there’s nobody that is ‘in charge'”?

“Who do you go to when the shit hits the fan,” is what people immediately tend to think. When people say leaderless or organization or we talk about it maybe in Gangplank at times, I don’t think we say as much anymore because of the problems that it causes.

We really say that there’s no appointed leadership. There’s no institutional authority. It’s the people that rise to the occasion. There’s still leaders, but they’re leaders because they’ve gained the influence by either what they’re doing, what they’re inspiring, or through some form of integrity. The leaders exist.

I would expect if you walk into most Gangplanks and you said, “Hey, how do I get this done”? Or “Who’s in charge of this”? There’s some idea of somebody who you might talk to, even though that person isn’t necessarily the anointed leader of something.

Chris:  That’s definitely a good example. When people come in and they ask about how they do something, there are definitely the people that we point to based on what they’re interested in participating in.

It’s not something where somebody said, “Hey, you’re the guy to go do this,” but just through their actions over time they’ve just shown that they can help with things and make things happen. Then we point people in those folks’ direction, depending on what they’re looking to participate in.

Jade:  It’s a meritocracy?

Derek:  Yeah, that’s a good way. We used to call it “showupocracy” which I think there’s a lot of value in that, but sometimes people can just show up and not actually provide guidance, cannot provide actually doing things.

Then you have an entitlement problem, which we’ve seen as well where, “Hey, I’ve been around here a long time, and I show up every day, therefore I should have final say and authority in absolutely everything because I’m the oldest turd in the room.” That’s really great, but what have you done for us lately?

Jade:  I think when that phrase originally was used, the idea of showing up and doing were one and the same.

Derek:  Yes.

Trish:  I think it’s the difference between taking initiative and the turfer ownership. Sometimes people come in and they try and claim that because they’ve been involved with some initiative or some area, but it’s theirs and everyone must get permission from them. We really go towards to whoever takes the initiative.

Also, it doesn’t really matter what title people have given you, if you’re not actually taking initiative, no one really looks at you as the leader.

Derek:  That’s an interesting thing that I definitely have seen over the last five, six years, whatever. There is a pattern of people that tend to want to come and participate in Gangplank. You can substitute the word Gangplank for community.

People that come into community generally want one of two things. They either want authority, “I want to be the whatever leader.” “I want to be in charge of this.” “I want this thing.” What they’re really saying is, “I want to be given institutional authority over people and things.”

Now, it might be a scope of things. “I don’t want to be the president of whatever this community is,” but “I want to be in charge of this aspect of the community. Please anoint me and give me that title, so that people are forced to do what I say and I’m entitled to certain resources that are available to me.”

The other thing I tend to see is that people want possessiveness of some kind. They come in and they either want the authority portion of it, or they want some form of possession.

Jade:  Exclusive domain over something?

Derek:  I would almost call it power, maybe even it is reverence from other people. I want people to have to respect my authority, because I am the thing. What we have found is that when people come in and do that, and you give them any form of leadership, it always, always ends poorly.

It either ends poorly because they don’t have the best interest of whatever they’re trying to lead, it’s really all about them. Or they tend to fall down very quickly because the minute that something starts to grow, and I think you see this in community when community really blossoms, it’s like that hockey stick growth in a start‑up.

It explodes so fast when it explodes, that if you do anything to contain it, you actually kill it instead of really letting it go. When you get those type of people, what happens is, community starts to build itself and that person is trying to wrangle, “But, I’m the boss, I’m the boss, I’m the boss. Why are you doing the podcasting? You didn’t check it out. You have to go through my process before you can use that resource, because I’m the podcast manager.”

You get all of this weird possessivy crap that starts to happen that turns people off. That’s one of the big differences between traditional community and an organization that’s a company. People that show up to company show up for a paycheck. They’ll tolerate a whole lot of shitty leadership in exchange for a paycheck.

When people come into a community and they’re not getting paid, they tend to tolerate a whole lot less of that kind of behavior before they’ll leave, or before they’ll say, “Yeah, I’m just not getting engaged. I’m not going to give you 100 percent of the best me that I’m interested in because of that.”

Jade:  How have we dealt with that problem?

Derek:  We suck at dealing with that problem.

Jade:  How should deal with that problem?

[laughter]

Derek:  Some of it is we have to get better at teaching people how to be good leaders. What I mean by that is, the world’s model currently of leadership is much more of an organizational, positional title of authority role. That is the status quo when you look at most leadership programs, even if they say, “We’re about servant leadership.”

At the end of the day, what they’re really trying to do is teach you ways to manage people. In Gangplank, it’s how do we teach people how to get the best out of people, not manage people. How do you inspire people to do really great things? How do you teach them the skills to be able to be more effective at what they do?

Jade:  I think one of the big things that we’ve done is, I used to call it “picking winners.” We were doing a lot of assigning people roles and authority and we’ve really put a stop to that. While that causes a bunch of chaos in the short term, the long term benefits far outweigh having some of that certainty of having this person in charge. We used to do that a lot. You were in charge of this initiative and we would ask people to take ownership of it.

Derek:  People were like children they begged. They begged us for a title. “Can I please”? And then we got stupid and we were like people are begging for it, maybe these, some of these initiatives that we have that we don’t have anybody to be dumb enough to be leaders for, maybe we could sucker them into being leaders, by giving them a title.

Then we found out, oh my God, they turned into these possessive ass holes the minute you give them a title. Maybe this is a bad thing but that is another pattern that I see or another thing that is very difficult about this type of leadership style and I am seeing it in organizations that are for‑profit businesses trying to go to a much more organic, self motivated…

Jade:  Autonomous.

Derek:  …autonomous type of things. What happens when nobody is motivated to do the thing that I think is really important so if we allow, OK here are these 10 initiatives, or these 7 initiatives, or these 3 initiatives, or this one big thing, or one big program and it’s necessary to be successful in a community and be a Gangplank.

We need people to step into that and you hear the crickets strip, and nobody steps into that, what do you do? Like, I know we did, we panicked and said, oh God we have got to get sucker somebody in to paint the fence like Tom Sawyer here and anoint them with, “You are in charge of this thing.” We used to do the thing of “Hey Chris, you are going to be in charge of whatever it is. Nobody will take, until you can find somebody else to be in charge of it.”

[crosstalk]

Derek:  And it solved some short‑term problems but it created all sorts of long‑term pain. Because either Chris really wasn’t interested in it or wasn’t interested in Gangplank. He wasn’t doing anything for it anyways. So we had this false sense of somebody was taking care of it and it wasn’t or if he didn’t and he did it than he got drunk with the power of “ho ho ho or moo ha ha, I am now the overlord Czar of this thing and I started to do all sorts of…”

Jade:  And he rules the calendar with the iron fist.

Derek:  Yeah.

[laughter]

Derek:  He could do all sorts of stupid stuff…

[laughter]

Derek:  …so I think, it’s a hard thing to do, it’s like, how do you inspire people to fill the holes that our organization has?

Jade:  What are some of the challenges that you guys have seen?

Trish:  I think one of the challenges, I mean it’s scary to be a leader. That trade‑off when you have managers that you have agreed to put up with your crap because they deal with the blame.

Jade:  I think it is really scared to choose to be that leader. Right?

Trish:  Right.

Jade:  Because it’s your fault.

Trish:  Yeah.

Chris:  I think one of the other challenges is that we still have holes that nobody has stepped up to fill. I remember the old days when people got appointed, we had all the different initiatives and at least had someone in name that was supposed to be working on something.

Since that doesn’t happen anymore, you have some people that are passionate about the initiative that they are working on and they are actively moving it forward, where we have other initiatives that really not much happens because there is nobody driving that. I think some of those things are important at Gangplank still.

Jade:  So how do we fix that problem?

Derek:  Some of it is, we do a poor job articulating why those things are important. It’s the classic kind of why problem, like we don’t say, why those things are so critical to a healthy successful Gangplank. Instead of just seeing it as a ship work, I will never forget like talking to [inaudible 14:23] about little bit about music and saying, ‘Hey, we really could use somebody to step up in this space.”

And at the time his big thing was like “What the hell does that even mean, like music”? Because it wasn’t the musical studios. I start talking about so much more than music. I think he got really interested in it, but then he was like “Yeah, but now it’s too overwhelming. I am not a physical artist and I am not of this and I am not of that and now I feel woefully underqualified to even begin to do that”

And I really think, especially in the instance of Gangplank ‑‑ it’s not just a community, but each one of those initiative is a tiny community within that community. You’ve got the community of a city and then you have got the community of the building and the space and the people within the city and then you have got another little subset inside of that ‑‑ that is an interest, am I interested in health? Am I interested in studios?

The hardest part about being a leader is how do you get followers? How do you build that community and that’s where we have really fallen down. We have not shown people how do you go out and solicit like what you are doing and what your vision is to other people to get them interested and get them to help you go where you want to go.

Chris:  Yeah, I think that’s true but the other thing that you said about letting people know how important some of these initiatives are to Gangplank is key, because you know there are people trying to lead initiatives that can use the help that you just mentioned but we have these other holes that we need to get filled. So I think really focusing on talking about the importance of those roles and functionalities is something like that can be really helpful.

Trish:  Could we do a podcast on each initiative?

Derek:  I think, we already did some of them. I think Gangplank Junior we might not have done, but the rest of it we have done.

Trish:  OK.

Jade:  That’s all the time we have for today. Thanks for listening to the Dangercast. If you have any suggestions or things you would like to hear us cover please email info@gangplankhq.com. Thanks.

play audio Dangercast #12   Leadership in Gangplank

Kim Moyers Announced as City of Chandler Downtown Redevelopment Manager

KimMoyers Kim Moyers Announced as City of Chandler Downtown Redevelopment Manager

Kim Moyers

Downtown Chandler has hired Kim Moyers as the new Redevelopment Manager to recruit businesses and guide development in downtown. Kim came from the Town of Queen Creek where she headed up the Queen Creek Incubator and lead many special initiatives and Capital Improvement projects.

Additionally, her experience includes serving as executive director of the Downtown Association/Small Business Development Center in Kokomo, IN, where she directed and supervised the association, which consisted of more than two thousand employees and 170 businesses within the downtown area.

“I look forward to being involved in the unique strategy that is required to develop a vibrant downtown,” said Moyers. “Chandler’s downtown is poised for growth and expansion and I look forward to being involved its success.”

Moyers holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Indiana University is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma Economic Development Institute and holds a Rutgers Certificate in Business District Management.

I have had the pleasure of working with Kim while sitting on the Queen Creek Economic Commission and at the AriZona Business Incubators Association. Excited for what this means for the Gangplank Chandler Local Initiative. Welcome Kim!

OneBookAZ eBook Publishing Program

onebookaz OneBookAZ eBook Publishing Program

One Book AZ

OneBookAZ, the annual all-ages reading program that brings people together through a shared literature experience. OneBookAZ encourages communities across the State of Arizona to read the same book at the same time and participate in discussions and programs centered on that book. This year, the writings of three Arizona “content creators” were chosen through an eBook writing competition that was held in November.

This year’s Adult selection is “Lauren Greasewater’s War,” by Stephen Hirst, “Corr Syl the Warrior,” by Garry Rogers is the Teen selection, and the Children’s book winner is “The Space Adventures of Jack Smacker Little Leaguer,” by Mike Giglio. All three books are available until June 1 for free digital download to a Kindle or any other e-reader at www.onebookaz.org and with a valid Chandler Public Library card. Users can visit any of the four Chandler Public Library locations if they need assistance in downloading any of the books.

Additionally, the Downtown Library will be hosting an eBook publishing program at 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 26 in the Copper Room, 22 S. Delaware Street. This program will feature author Vincent Alascia, who will discuss this new frontier for authors, small presses, and the traditional publishing industry.

“This program, on a practical level, will assist authors and aspiring authors by presenting viable approaches to navigating the learning curve presented by digital publishing,” said Chandler Librarian Ted Liebler. “Taking a wider perspective, digital publishing fits into the maker movement in that the library can provide technical information to help support the manifestation of a creative work.”

The annual One Book AZ program was brought to Arizona in 2002, and coordinated by the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, a division of the Secretary of State.

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