Get Your Sewing On at Gangplank Avondale

Gangplank Labs just got an industrial sewing machine. Rated at 1/3 horsepower, this 1950’s era machine can sew through leather, canvas, and probably thin plywood. Some assembly required – look for future updates to see when it’s time to bring your tough sewing projects to Hack Night. (Hack night happens every Tuesday from 7-9PM. It’s free, and everyone’s invited!)
 Get Your Sewing On at Gangplank Avondale
Chris is interested in using the machine  to sew a finished edge onto some rugs, Elia is interested making her own super slim leather wallet, and Heather wants to make custom fit leather sandals. What will YOU make?

Dangercast #12 – Leadership in Gangplank

Jade Meskill, Derek Neighbors, Trish Gillam, and Chris ‘Dragon’ Lee discuss how leadership works in Gangplank.

 

Transcript

Jade Meskill:  Hello and welcome to the “Dangercast.” We are going to talk about the culture and design of Gangplank. I’m Jade Meskill.

Derek Neighbors:  I’m Derek Neighbors.

Trish Gillam:  I’m Trish Gillam.

Chris Lee:  And I’m Chris Lee.

Jade:  Today, we are going to talk about, what does it mean to be a leader inside of Gangplank?

Derek:  Inside of Gangplank, what does it take to be a leader?

Jade:  What does it mean?

Derek:  Oh, what does it mean?

Jade:  Yeah.

Derek:  I just say that what is takes would be too stupid that you are a leader.

[laughter]

Jade:  No, no. We don’t want to talk about that.

Derek:  What does it mean to be a leader? It means that you are inspiring and motivating and modeling and showing the way for other people. It’s equal parts doing and inspiration.

Jade:  How’s that different than being a leader somewhere else?

Derek:  Leader somewhere else ‑‑ usually it’s you adopted the title Leader because somebody gave you the title of leader.

Chris:  Here, you just work to make things happen. Nobody’s necessarily telling you what to do or giving you the authority to go do something. You just step up and start doing stuff and start making things happen.

Derek:  I’d say outside Gangplank, the way leadership tends to work, or that I see it in most organizations, is somebody is given the title of leader. Usually that title of leader is manager, director, vice‑president, president, CEO, you name whatever title you want to put behind that.

Two things are extended via that title. One is authority. You have the authority to do something, usually over other people. You have the authority over other people and resources to do things. If we don’t get results, it’s your fault. You get accountability.

What happens is that those that report to “said leaders,” view it exactly as that. You get to lord over me, so I have no stake and no ownership in the outcome that is to be. If anything goes wrong, it’s your fault.

Jade:  That’s positional authority.

Derek:  Positional authority.

Jade:  We’ve used the term “leaderless organization” quite a bit. I think that causes some confusion, so maybe reconcile that idea with what we’re talking about. Chris said there’s no positional authority at Gangplank. We’ve talked about that idea of being a leaderless organization. How does that actually work in practice?

Derek:  A lot of people when they think when you say “leaderless organization,” they immediately jump to, “Oh man, it’s just 100 percent chaos. Nobody’s in charge. Nothing will get done. How do you resolve any dispute? How does anything happen because there’s nobody that is ‘in charge'”?

“Who do you go to when the shit hits the fan,” is what people immediately tend to think. When people say leaderless or organization or we talk about it maybe in Gangplank at times, I don’t think we say as much anymore because of the problems that it causes.

We really say that there’s no appointed leadership. There’s no institutional authority. It’s the people that rise to the occasion. There’s still leaders, but they’re leaders because they’ve gained the influence by either what they’re doing, what they’re inspiring, or through some form of integrity. The leaders exist.

I would expect if you walk into most Gangplanks and you said, “Hey, how do I get this done”? Or “Who’s in charge of this”? There’s some idea of somebody who you might talk to, even though that person isn’t necessarily the anointed leader of something.

Chris:  That’s definitely a good example. When people come in and they ask about how they do something, there are definitely the people that we point to based on what they’re interested in participating in.

It’s not something where somebody said, “Hey, you’re the guy to go do this,” but just through their actions over time they’ve just shown that they can help with things and make things happen. Then we point people in those folks’ direction, depending on what they’re looking to participate in.

Jade:  It’s a meritocracy?

Derek:  Yeah, that’s a good way. We used to call it “showupocracy” which I think there’s a lot of value in that, but sometimes people can just show up and not actually provide guidance, cannot provide actually doing things.

Then you have an entitlement problem, which we’ve seen as well where, “Hey, I’ve been around here a long time, and I show up every day, therefore I should have final say and authority in absolutely everything because I’m the oldest turd in the room.” That’s really great, but what have you done for us lately?

Jade:  I think when that phrase originally was used, the idea of showing up and doing were one and the same.

Derek:  Yes.

Trish:  I think it’s the difference between taking initiative and the turfer ownership. Sometimes people come in and they try and claim that because they’ve been involved with some initiative or some area, but it’s theirs and everyone must get permission from them. We really go towards to whoever takes the initiative.

Also, it doesn’t really matter what title people have given you, if you’re not actually taking initiative, no one really looks at you as the leader.

Derek:  That’s an interesting thing that I definitely have seen over the last five, six years, whatever. There is a pattern of people that tend to want to come and participate in Gangplank. You can substitute the word Gangplank for community.

People that come into community generally want one of two things. They either want authority, “I want to be the whatever leader.” “I want to be in charge of this.” “I want this thing.” What they’re really saying is, “I want to be given institutional authority over people and things.”

Now, it might be a scope of things. “I don’t want to be the president of whatever this community is,” but “I want to be in charge of this aspect of the community. Please anoint me and give me that title, so that people are forced to do what I say and I’m entitled to certain resources that are available to me.”

The other thing I tend to see is that people want possessiveness of some kind. They come in and they either want the authority portion of it, or they want some form of possession.

Jade:  Exclusive domain over something?

Derek:  I would almost call it power, maybe even it is reverence from other people. I want people to have to respect my authority, because I am the thing. What we have found is that when people come in and do that, and you give them any form of leadership, it always, always ends poorly.

It either ends poorly because they don’t have the best interest of whatever they’re trying to lead, it’s really all about them. Or they tend to fall down very quickly because the minute that something starts to grow, and I think you see this in community when community really blossoms, it’s like that hockey stick growth in a start‑up.

It explodes so fast when it explodes, that if you do anything to contain it, you actually kill it instead of really letting it go. When you get those type of people, what happens is, community starts to build itself and that person is trying to wrangle, “But, I’m the boss, I’m the boss, I’m the boss. Why are you doing the podcasting? You didn’t check it out. You have to go through my process before you can use that resource, because I’m the podcast manager.”

You get all of this weird possessivy crap that starts to happen that turns people off. That’s one of the big differences between traditional community and an organization that’s a company. People that show up to company show up for a paycheck. They’ll tolerate a whole lot of shitty leadership in exchange for a paycheck.

When people come into a community and they’re not getting paid, they tend to tolerate a whole lot less of that kind of behavior before they’ll leave, or before they’ll say, “Yeah, I’m just not getting engaged. I’m not going to give you 100 percent of the best me that I’m interested in because of that.”

Jade:  How have we dealt with that problem?

Derek:  We suck at dealing with that problem.

Jade:  How should deal with that problem?

[laughter]

Derek:  Some of it is we have to get better at teaching people how to be good leaders. What I mean by that is, the world’s model currently of leadership is much more of an organizational, positional title of authority role. That is the status quo when you look at most leadership programs, even if they say, “We’re about servant leadership.”

At the end of the day, what they’re really trying to do is teach you ways to manage people. In Gangplank, it’s how do we teach people how to get the best out of people, not manage people. How do you inspire people to do really great things? How do you teach them the skills to be able to be more effective at what they do?

Jade:  I think one of the big things that we’ve done is, I used to call it “picking winners.” We were doing a lot of assigning people roles and authority and we’ve really put a stop to that. While that causes a bunch of chaos in the short term, the long term benefits far outweigh having some of that certainty of having this person in charge. We used to do that a lot. You were in charge of this initiative and we would ask people to take ownership of it.

Derek:  People were like children they begged. They begged us for a title. “Can I please”? And then we got stupid and we were like people are begging for it, maybe these, some of these initiatives that we have that we don’t have anybody to be dumb enough to be leaders for, maybe we could sucker them into being leaders, by giving them a title.

Then we found out, oh my God, they turned into these possessive ass holes the minute you give them a title. Maybe this is a bad thing but that is another pattern that I see or another thing that is very difficult about this type of leadership style and I am seeing it in organizations that are for‑profit businesses trying to go to a much more organic, self motivated…

Jade:  Autonomous.

Derek:  …autonomous type of things. What happens when nobody is motivated to do the thing that I think is really important so if we allow, OK here are these 10 initiatives, or these 7 initiatives, or these 3 initiatives, or this one big thing, or one big program and it’s necessary to be successful in a community and be a Gangplank.

We need people to step into that and you hear the crickets strip, and nobody steps into that, what do you do? Like, I know we did, we panicked and said, oh God we have got to get sucker somebody in to paint the fence like Tom Sawyer here and anoint them with, “You are in charge of this thing.” We used to do the thing of “Hey Chris, you are going to be in charge of whatever it is. Nobody will take, until you can find somebody else to be in charge of it.”

[crosstalk]

Derek:  And it solved some short‑term problems but it created all sorts of long‑term pain. Because either Chris really wasn’t interested in it or wasn’t interested in Gangplank. He wasn’t doing anything for it anyways. So we had this false sense of somebody was taking care of it and it wasn’t or if he didn’t and he did it than he got drunk with the power of “ho ho ho or moo ha ha, I am now the overlord Czar of this thing and I started to do all sorts of…”

Jade:  And he rules the calendar with the iron fist.

Derek:  Yeah.

[laughter]

Derek:  He could do all sorts of stupid stuff…

[laughter]

Derek:  …so I think, it’s a hard thing to do, it’s like, how do you inspire people to fill the holes that our organization has?

Jade:  What are some of the challenges that you guys have seen?

Trish:  I think one of the challenges, I mean it’s scary to be a leader. That trade‑off when you have managers that you have agreed to put up with your crap because they deal with the blame.

Jade:  I think it is really scared to choose to be that leader. Right?

Trish:  Right.

Jade:  Because it’s your fault.

Trish:  Yeah.

Chris:  I think one of the other challenges is that we still have holes that nobody has stepped up to fill. I remember the old days when people got appointed, we had all the different initiatives and at least had someone in name that was supposed to be working on something.

Since that doesn’t happen anymore, you have some people that are passionate about the initiative that they are working on and they are actively moving it forward, where we have other initiatives that really not much happens because there is nobody driving that. I think some of those things are important at Gangplank still.

Jade:  So how do we fix that problem?

Derek:  Some of it is, we do a poor job articulating why those things are important. It’s the classic kind of why problem, like we don’t say, why those things are so critical to a healthy successful Gangplank. Instead of just seeing it as a ship work, I will never forget like talking to [inaudible 14:23] about little bit about music and saying, ‘Hey, we really could use somebody to step up in this space.”

And at the time his big thing was like “What the hell does that even mean, like music”? Because it wasn’t the musical studios. I start talking about so much more than music. I think he got really interested in it, but then he was like “Yeah, but now it’s too overwhelming. I am not a physical artist and I am not of this and I am not of that and now I feel woefully underqualified to even begin to do that”

And I really think, especially in the instance of Gangplank ‑‑ it’s not just a community, but each one of those initiative is a tiny community within that community. You’ve got the community of a city and then you have got the community of the building and the space and the people within the city and then you have got another little subset inside of that ‑‑ that is an interest, am I interested in health? Am I interested in studios?

The hardest part about being a leader is how do you get followers? How do you build that community and that’s where we have really fallen down. We have not shown people how do you go out and solicit like what you are doing and what your vision is to other people to get them interested and get them to help you go where you want to go.

Chris:  Yeah, I think that’s true but the other thing that you said about letting people know how important some of these initiatives are to Gangplank is key, because you know there are people trying to lead initiatives that can use the help that you just mentioned but we have these other holes that we need to get filled. So I think really focusing on talking about the importance of those roles and functionalities is something like that can be really helpful.

Trish:  Could we do a podcast on each initiative?

Derek:  I think, we already did some of them. I think Gangplank Junior we might not have done, but the rest of it we have done.

Trish:  OK.

Jade:  That’s all the time we have for today. Thanks for listening to the Dangercast. If you have any suggestions or things you would like to hear us cover please email info@gangplankhq.com. Thanks.

play audio Dangercast #12   Leadership in Gangplank

Kim Moyers Announced as City of Chandler Downtown Redevelopment Manager

KimMoyers Kim Moyers Announced as City of Chandler Downtown Redevelopment Manager

Kim Moyers

Downtown Chandler has hired Kim Moyers as the new Redevelopment Manager to recruit businesses and guide development in downtown. Kim came from the Town of Queen Creek where she headed up the Queen Creek Incubator and lead many special initiatives and Capital Improvement projects.

Additionally, her experience includes serving as executive director of the Downtown Association/Small Business Development Center in Kokomo, IN, where she directed and supervised the association, which consisted of more than two thousand employees and 170 businesses within the downtown area.

“I look forward to being involved in the unique strategy that is required to develop a vibrant downtown,” said Moyers. “Chandler’s downtown is poised for growth and expansion and I look forward to being involved its success.”

Moyers holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Indiana University is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma Economic Development Institute and holds a Rutgers Certificate in Business District Management.

I have had the pleasure of working with Kim while sitting on the Queen Creek Economic Commission and at the AriZona Business Incubators Association. Excited for what this means for the Gangplank Chandler Local Initiative. Welcome Kim!

OneBookAZ eBook Publishing Program

onebookaz OneBookAZ eBook Publishing Program

One Book AZ

OneBookAZ, the annual all-ages reading program that brings people together through a shared literature experience. OneBookAZ encourages communities across the State of Arizona to read the same book at the same time and participate in discussions and programs centered on that book. This year, the writings of three Arizona “content creators” were chosen through an eBook writing competition that was held in November.

This year’s Adult selection is “Lauren Greasewater’s War,” by Stephen Hirst, “Corr Syl the Warrior,” by Garry Rogers is the Teen selection, and the Children’s book winner is “The Space Adventures of Jack Smacker Little Leaguer,” by Mike Giglio. All three books are available until June 1 for free digital download to a Kindle or any other e-reader at www.onebookaz.org and with a valid Chandler Public Library card. Users can visit any of the four Chandler Public Library locations if they need assistance in downloading any of the books.

Additionally, the Downtown Library will be hosting an eBook publishing program at 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 26 in the Copper Room, 22 S. Delaware Street. This program will feature author Vincent Alascia, who will discuss this new frontier for authors, small presses, and the traditional publishing industry.

“This program, on a practical level, will assist authors and aspiring authors by presenting viable approaches to navigating the learning curve presented by digital publishing,” said Chandler Librarian Ted Liebler. “Taking a wider perspective, digital publishing fits into the maker movement in that the library can provide technical information to help support the manifestation of a creative work.”

The annual One Book AZ program was brought to Arizona in 2002, and coordinated by the Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, a division of the Secretary of State.

LibCon 2014 in Chandler, Arizona

LibCon 2014 is a comic book and sci-fi convention for valley teenagers at the Boys & Girls Club Compadre Branch located at 300 East Chandler Boulevard in Downtown Chandler.

Now in its fourth year, LibCon brings teens ages 12-18 together fans of comic books, Japanese manga and anime, role-playing, costume play, video games, and other fantasy and science-fiction entertainment. More than 400 teens are expected to attend this free event and registration is now open. A free continental breakfast and lunch are included, courtesy of the Friends of the Chandler Public Library and Chandler Unified School District.

Participants can choose to attend a variety of sessions, including everything from making Candy Sushi, to creating your own blog and comic book, to watching award-winning actor Mike Traylor bring Edgar Allen Poe’s tales of horror alive. There will be all-day gaming, with tournaments, as well as a workshop on creating your own role-playing games.

Three authors will also be at LibCon 2014. Aprilynne Pike, author of the best-selling novel, “Wings”, will be debuting her new novel, “Life After Theft.” Brand new author, Amy K. Nichols, will be talking about her upcoming debut novel, “Now That You’re Here.” And OneBookAZ teen novel winner, Garry Rogers, will be discussing his ebook, “Corr Syl the Warrior.”

Organizers hope that LibCon inspires teens to tap into their creativity, to take advantage of resources available in their community to express themselves. Cecelia L., age 18, attended last year’s event and likes the event for its non-intimidating size. “It’s a wonderful way to enter the world of conventions. The panels are always fun, and meeting other amazing people is a highlight,” Cecelia said.

Each year, the Library conducts a contest to select the annual LibCon logo. The high level of quality for this year’s contest resulted two winning logos being chosen. Yujin J., age 17 and Lauren D., 15, were the winning artists and each received a $50 Visa gift card. Their creations can be seen on the LibCon Facebook page.

Avondale Labs Planning a Summer of Electronics

On Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 Gangplank Avondale’s makers gathered to brainstorm how to amp up the Avondale Labs Initiative. After a burst of ideas, we narrowed it to a “Summer of Electronics”. We are meeting again next Tuesday the 15th at 7pm to further plan this electrifying summer.

For those interested in seeing the crazy list of future ideas the group came up with, here they are:

Set up a soldering station
Meet once a month on a Saturday (maybe a youth event once a month)
Paper electronics for kids
Install fest – help those with less tech knowledge install Linux
Reach out to local neighborhood
Tear down day
Etsy Craft Party
Pinterest Party
Quad Copter night (or break that up into multiple projects and advertise each separately)
Metal work class
Amateur Radio
Furniture refinishing
HAM site
Big group projects
Simon says arduino
rockets
Movie projector – Theater night
Gunsmithing
welding
Metal milling
Cold Metal forming
metal working
Tig Welding
Jewelry Making
Brewing/distilling apparatus
Catapults
Concrete work (shaping)
Glass work
DIY Astronomy (homebuilt telescopes)
Tesla coil
Arduino/ Raspberry pi/ single board computers
Home automation
LEGO
Jacobs Ladder
Videography
Hacking
Nixie Tube
Vacuum tube amp
Aerial Photography
Drones
Technology as art
3D Printing
3d Printer mentoring
Textiles (sewing, embroidery)
woodworking
car computer
pyro
Fire
Learn to code (coding classes)
Rasberry Pi car ecc
Yoga class
Going from prototype to production
CAD Meetup
Painting class
Life Drawing
Screen printing
Upcycyling
Info dispersion
Secure communication
Networks
Traditional casting methods
Mento fountains
outreach event
community building events
robots
inventors club
Theremin
laser cutter/ engraver
Make a thon

Summer Outreach and Communication Internships Available

Gangplank Outreach and Communication Intern

Gangplank is seeking energetic, fun, and creative Outreach and Communication interns to help share the Gangplank story and engage local residents. Gangplank is committed to providing excellent educational opportunities. This unpaid position will provide interns with experience in outreach and communications for a global nonprofit while supporting the creation of vibrant communities. Interns will have opportunities to learn and use a variety of skills including event planning, social media marketing, writing press releases, photography, and video. Summer internships begins June 5, 2014.

As part of telling Gangplank’s story, interns will also have opportunities to explore 3D printing, electronics, entrepreneurship, design, software development, community development, and economic development.

This position supports all of Gangplank’s Phoenix Metro locations. Currently we have locations in Chandler and Avondale. Interns can choose to be based out of either location. Travel to events throughout the Phoenix Metro area is required.

Job Responsibilities:

• Organize, attend, and or participate in events related to Gangplank initiatives.

• Create fun and interactive displays for outreach tables.

• Create, update, and respond to social media and blog posts.

• Create videos and other multimedia communications

• Craft and distribute press releases as needed.

• Performs related duties as needed.

Qualifications: 

• Must have a strong desire to learn.

• Excellent communication skills.

• Energetic and creative individuals who are capable of making decisions on their own.

To apply please submit your resume  to Trish@gangplankhq.com no later than May 15, 2014.

RockIT Bootcamp – Launch Your IT Career

 

rockIT logo@2x RockIT Bootcamp   Launch Your IT Career

 

This is great opportunity at an inaugural run of a new program.  The first cohort will have all tuition costs waived.  If you have thought about becoming an Web Developer, this is your chance.

Inaugural Class Begins April 2014 [ Apply Now ]

What is IT?

RockIT is an immersive, 12-week bootcamp in web development. The full-time program focuses on building hands-on skills using real world examples and projects. RockIT teaches the skills that entry level web development professionals need to succeed in a career in one of today’s technology jobs.

Learn from experienced instructors – web developers who are working closely with local employers – so that RockIT can help meet the growing demand for front end web developers in the Metro Phoenix area.

Learn:

  • HTML5
  • JavaScript
  • CSS3
  • jQuery
  • PHP
  • MySQL

CURRICULUM

You will learn something new every day. You will write code every day. Everything that is included in the curriculum is relevant and important to starting a career in web development. Industry experts have created an integrated curriculum that leads you through the theory but more importantly the practice. You will work individually, in pairs and in small teams to solve problems, crack the code and build real world web applications. You will work much harder and for much longer than you think.

COMPLETION

Everything you have learned comes together in final phase of the bootcamp as you demonstrate proficiency in web development skills through an individual project and a team project. What you have learned prepares you for the first step in a career including confidence, skills and knowledge. The applications you have created build a portfolio of work that you will be proud of and able to take with you.

CAREERS

Embedded throughout the program are a series of career exploration related activities. The curriculum includes networking events, peer level meetups, job searching skills, resume writing and interview techniques to add to the body of web development work you have completed. A career fair as part of the final phase of the bootcamp enables you to meet with local web development agencies and employers.

Chandler Community Meeting Notes 3/12

NOTE: We haven’t regularly held meetings since the new year due to a lack of need. Meetings can be called at the regular time by anyone, however, and we encourage people who need the community’s engagement to request meetings as needed.  Today’s meeting was held to inform the community of a few notable happenings in recent weeks.

Meeting Started at 4:02PM

Startup Weekend Chandler, hosted by Gangplank, announced for July 2014

Eileen K (LilliMedia) proudly announced that she is aiding Troy B (Athlinks), as coordinator, in planning and promoting our next Startup Weekend.  By popular demand, the weekend moves back to the summer months and will be held July 18th – 20th, 2014.  Expect Troy to begin asking individuals and companies for support in the coming days.

Maker Faire coming to Chandler by DCCP, Gangplank, Tech Shop, and ASU

Jenn L (DCCP) announced that the Downtown Chandler Community Partnership received support to host an official, branded Maker Faire.  They are looking to either piggyback the event on an October 2014 event or host it the weekend of Jan 15th, 2015 as a one-year anniversary of Tech Shop and the Mayor’s declaration of January 15th as “Maker Day” in Chandler.  They will be seeking support and sponsors and will keep us updated.

New Brownbag Coordinator Kristin of Jacob’s Well, Needs Support

First off, thanks again to Hiring Solved’s Jenny who carefully stewarded Brownbags for the latter half of 2013.  And huge thanks to our newest Brownbag coordinator, Kristin L of Jacob’s Well. Our schedule, due in part to some uncertainty during the passing of the baton, has us with only about 1 month of brownbags scheduled.  Like always, the community needs to look through their contacts to help her with some speaker ideas.

Pizza on Hacknights Back thanks to Hiring Solved

Hiring Solved is graciously sponsoring Hack Night pizza again!  Next time to you see Shon B or Trevor O of Hiring Solved, you should give them a high-five or a hug.  They officially sponsor pizza but will need help picking it up.  Hans M (LilliMedia) volunteered to assist with pickup.  Trish G (Gangplank) suggested all of us to keep an eye out for pizza delivery by 6PM if you’re here, and if its not here, go look for Trevor!

Discussion on Vending Machines

Bonanza Educational continues to support the vending machines, both by financially backing them when the fund runs low and also keeping them stocked.  They’ve been ordering and stocking them for two years this month and managing the finances for one year last month.

Jeremy S (Bonanza Ed) reports that sales average around $300 / month, up dramatically from $125/month before the Red Bull Machine was restocked in August and a “Vending” vinyl sign was made and posted by Kristi (DCCP).  The machines require a 6-8 week purchase cycle.

We (Gangplank) own the Coke machine and are lent the Red Bull Machine by Red Bull USA.  Repairs on the Coke machine are on us, and the recent issues with Coke being vended in place of people’s actual selection was just fixed.  Give Greg T (MarketingPress) a high-five or hug for donating $115 to cover the costs of the repair.

V8 VFusion juice drinks will be back in stock shortly, Jeremy is just waiting for the Hanson’s Naturals slot to empty.  Then, Hanson’s Naturals will be left out of stock until the San Pellegrino Blood Orange runs out.  The San Pellegrino drinks were a special purchase made possible by a Costco Rebate and we simply cannot afford them after the current supply, purchased on the discount, runs out.

Some members of the community asked for a few changes to the selection and Jeremy explained that it has taken over two years of refining the selection to get us to the current assortment.  Many of the drinks are enjoyed by many, where, in the past, some options took up an entire slot just for a few fans of that option.  While he is is confident in the current selection, ideas may be brought to Jeremy offline.

Brian S (Bonanza Ed) asks the community permission to install a table-top snack vending machine and stock it with a 50%/50% supply of healthy and yummy snacks.  He said that Bonanza will support these similarly to the soft drinks. Ideas for things to include Kashi bars, apple chips, various candy, nuts, and chips.  The community welcomed it with a verbal vote.

Jeremy keeps a small amount of change at GP for people who want to turn a $10 or $5 into $1’s to use in the vending machines.  If he is at his desk, he welcomes anyone to stop by and get change if they need it.

Call for Members that Need Keys, Alarm Code Changes

Jeremy (Bonanza Ed) requested that members needing alarm codes, alarm code changes, or new keys please reach out to him this week offline.

“Magic Space” Not Magic Anymore

Jeremy (Bonanza Ed) updated the community on the status of 250’s Suite 3 & 5, our neighbors, or what we lovingly called the Magic Space.  The lease holder of the space was officially evicted last week and the property’s receiver is confident the new space will be leased to a new entity in the near future.  Potential new tenants are touring the space.  If you see them, make them feel welcome!

All Gangplank property was successfully removed from Magic Space to our knowledge, but let us know if you think we forgot something.  Chris L (CSI) updated us on events scheduled for the former Magic Space are now in the GP Main Space until 260 opens, notably:

  • Jacob’s Well Church now meets regularly on Sunday mornings.  You’re welcome to be in the space when they’re here, especially if you wish to join their worship.
  • Desert Code Camp speaker’s dinner and after party will be here Friday, April 4th and Saturday, April 5th in the evening.  They will be responsible for moving furniture out and back, but its recommended you clean up your desks.
  • Southeast Valley .NET User’s Group will now be in here every 4th Thursday starting 3/27.  Over the years, their group grew to 50+.  They are responsible for moving chairs and furniture.   If you’re here expect it to be busy.

260 Construction Update

Trish G (Gangplank HQ) updated everyone on the status of the 260 construction.  Project is over budget and we will need to assist in a few fundraisers.  The second floor is going up this week and next so watch out for some major changes to happen fast!  The construction crews sees a completion by late April to early May.  Yes… less than 90 days!

GP Jr.

Josh S (Bonanza Ed) discussed his desire to lead a renewed effort into Gangplank Jr.  Chris S also said he wants to get things going too.  A last minute idea of a table-top gaming event, in honor of the annual table-top gaming day, to be held on April 5, was suggested.  Discussion will move offline.

Gangplank Booth at Mesa Maker Faire

Eileen K (LilliMedia) and Trish G (Gangplank HQ) discussed our last-minute involvement in the Mesa Maker Faire in Downtown Mesa next week.  They acknowledged that it is an awkward weekend but that they need help in the form a one-three people to staff the booth and share GP and its maker programs.  They do need help, so please help if you can!  The event is auxiliary to the spark! Festival in Mesa, where Bonanza Ed will be running a big booth, so feel free to stop by there too.

General Announcements

  • St Patrick’s Day at Murphy’s Law 3/17.  If you want to go check in with DCCP.
  • Beer and BBQ Festival 3/21. DCCP also has tickets.  Performances by Blues Traveller.
  • Chandler Jazz Festival 4/4 & 4/5.  DCCP has tickets.

Meeting Ended at 4:35PM

Welcome Sean Duggan, City of Chandler Police Chief

529ce3559ce5c.image 1 Welcome Sean Duggan, City of Chandler Police Chief

Sean Duggan

As many of you know Chandler Police Chief Sherry Kiyler retired late last year. After a nationwide search, the city announced in late November that Sean Duggan would be the new Police Chief for the city. Myself and Jennifer Lindley had the pleasure of spending some time getting to know Sean, who reached out to Gangplank and Downtown Chandler Community Partnership as an applicant because he wanted to know more about our community. Sean is a class act that gets a connected community is the right place to start with public safety.

Sean is a 27 year veteran from the Scottsdale Police Department. Duggan is just the kind of leadership we need in Chandler and the kind of collaborator that brings all sorts of new possibilities for Gangplank to think outside of the box. Join us in welcoming him as you see him around.

Locations

Avondale, AZ

Chandler, AZ

Richmond, VA

Sault St. Marie, ON

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